Tag Archives: Book Review

LAWYERS, LITIGATION & MEMORY: THE MEMORY ILLUSION

A single moment of logical thought will lead to the conclusion that it is strange that lawyers don’t learn about memory.  Much (indeed most) litigation relies on the memory of the parties.  Judges are, more often than not, called upon to decide whose memory of events is the most accurate. The judge cannot shy away […]

IF ONLY SOMEONE WOULD WRITE A BOOK ON EXPERTS…

There have been many occasions on this blog where I have commented on expert evidence. The links below show many cases where experts have caused major problems (usually for the party instructing them). There are numerous reports of cases where an expert has gone awry, sometimes badly awry (on one occasion the expert simply fled […]

BOOK REVIEW: OCCUPIERS, HIGHWAYS AND DEFECTIVE PREMISES CLAIMS: WILL IT STOP YOUR CLAIMS SLIPPING UP?

Law books nowadays are not reviewed enough. Particularly practitioner’s texts.  Given that there are precious few legal bookshops in which people can browse it is nice to see s a review now and again. I have been sent a copy of Occupiers, Highways and Defective Premises Claims: A Practical Guide Post-Jackson, by Andrew McKie. THE […]