THE HUMBLE CASE SUMMARY: A NEGLECTED ART: I’M ON THE LOOKOUT FOR EXAMPLES OF BEST PRACTICE

The New Law Journal last month carried an important article from District Judge Nigel Law about his experience with case summaries in the county court.  The case summaries he found were too long and rarely useful.  This set me looking for examples of “good” case summaries. The search was fruitless. There is no doubt that the case summary is a humble, overlooked, document.  I am now on the lookout  for examples of “best practice”.

“The importance of the case summary, chronology, and schedule of issues cannot be overstated. The greatest compliment you can receive is for the judge to quote in his judgment from one or more of these documents.”

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT CASE SUMMARIES

In brief District Judge Law stated case summaries are either:

  • Too long (“4 pages of 10 point font”)
  • Too rambling.
  • Not present at all.

The article points to the importance of the case summary to the judge hearing a CMC.

THE LITIGATOR’S DILEMMA

There is no doubt that these can be “challenging” documents to draft they have to be:

  • Succinct.
  • Comprehensive.
  • Non-adversarial.
  • Useful.

Yet little guidance is available.

THE RULES

Practice Direction 29 – the Multi Track

“5.6  To assist the court, the parties and their legal advisers should:
(1) ensure that all documents that the court is likely to ask to see (including witness statements and experts’ reports) are brought to the hearing,
(2) consider whether the parties should attend,
(3) consider whether a case summary will be useful, and
(4) consider what orders each wishes to be made and give notice of them to the other parties.
5.7
(1) A case summary:
(a) should be designed to assist the court to understand and deal with the questions before it,
(b) should set out a brief chronology of the claim, the issues of fact which are agreed or in dispute and the evidence needed to decide them,
(c) should not normally exceed 500 words in length, and
(d) should be prepared by the claimant and agreed with the other parties if possible.”

FURTHER GUIDANCE FROM THE DISTRICT JUDGE

District Judge Lord also reminds practitioners that:

  • A case summary should be a concise but complete overview of the whole case.
  • It is designed so that the judge can quickly grasp the essential facts and matters in issue.
  • Reading time is limited.
  • Deliver the case summary in good time.
  • Sending the case summary the same morning as the hearing is never helpful.

GUIDANCE FROM THE HANDBOOK FOR LITIGANTS IN PERSON

At 13.13 the guidance states:

“Some judges order a Case Summary to be prepared and filed. This is a brief statement of your case, hopefully on one side of A4; you do not need to give a detailed account. A good case summary will be non contentious and will set out the nature of the dispute and the issues that arise on the pleadings. Try and agree a case summary with your opponent and file it in court before the hearing so that the judge can read it and be up to speed with the case when the hearing begins.”

THE SEARCH FOR EXAMPLES

It is difficult to find any examples or “precedents” of case summaries. The main purpose of this post is to invite practitioners to send in (suitably anonymised). Similarly if judges have examples of excellence which (again anonymised) could be sent in at least there will be a bank of good examples.

KICKING OFF WITH A SIMPLE EXAMPLE: A PERSONAL INJURY CLAIM

IN THE  COUNTY COURT IN GALTRES                                                                      Case No

BETWEEN:

 

MASTER RUPERT BOAR

(BY HIS FATHER AND LITIGATION FRIEND MR DENTON BOAR)                                         Claimant

-and-

 

MR DAVID GORDON                                                                                                         Defendant

                                                                       

CASE SUMMARY

                                                                       

  1. This action arises out of injuries that Rupert suffered on the 21st October 2014 when he was 10 years old.

THE DISPUTED FACTS

  1. Rupert’s case is that he was walking past the Defendant’s shop as the Defendant was using a bungee rope with metal hooks to close the shop shutters. The bungee rope that the Defendant was using flicked off the shutter and struck Rupert in the eye causing serious injury.
  1. The Defendant admits that Rupert suffered an injury however he is not aware of how the injury happened. He denies that he was using a bungee rope with hooks to close the shop shutters and that Rupert was injured in the way alleged.

(1)   The Claimant’s case is that he was injured by a bungee rope operated by the                                 Defendant.

(2) The Defendant’s case is that Rupert was injured some distance from his

premises.

  1. THE ISSUES: LIABILITY

(1) How Rupert came to be injured.

(2) Whether the Defendant was negligent.

(3) Whether the Defendant’s negligence caused Lewis’ injuries.

  1. DAMAGES There is only one medical report, the Defendant has not sought to obtain his own report, nor has have any questions been put to the expert.

(1)   There is no claim for special damage.

(2) There is no agreement in relation to  general damages. (Any agreement would require                   approval from the Court in any event because Rupert is a minor).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: